LPN’s: The Responsibilities

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Posted on 31st March 2010 by admin in Uncategorized

The responsiblities of a new nurse are exciting and refreshing.  If you are transitioning from being a student at LPN schools to becoming an LPN (licensed practical nurse), you should be proud and prepared to make a difference on any allied health team you choose to work with.  A nurse is a professional caregiver, and someone who works with the patient to advocate their wishes.  LPN’s promote health, educate clients and their families, strive to eliminate pain and suffering, and reassure and comfort patients.  A nurse has a great physical and sometimes emotional responsiblity to take careful care and treat patents.  Nursing is one of the most rewarding professions, and yet at times can be frustrating, draining, and a thankless job.  An LPN is a highly skilled individual who learns to combine the scientific aspect of health care with the fine intuitive art of caring.  The world of nursing will welcome you as you embark on your new career.  Know that you have made a wise and wonderful choice to give of yourself and to help make a difference in someone else’s life every day.  Being an LPN can bring a great deal of joy in exchange for countless hours of heartfelt love.  The allied health field of nursing will require a great deal of physical stamina and a strong sense of humor at times in order to perform your daily tasks.  Let us help you to keep a light heart.  Read our blog daily to learn little tips and tid bits to make your job, and your life a positive contribution.  More encouragement tomorrow.  Join us.

LPN’s: Dating Doctors

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Posted on 30th March 2010 by admin in Uncategorized

As an LPN, licensed practical nurse, the etticate is clear about dating doctors.  Although it is tempting, try to resist.  If you are dating a doctor, or anyone in a more powerful position within the facility, you will most likely be seen as a brown noser.  Any advancement or promotions you might receive will probably be seen as special favors and not something you earned.  Keep that in mind.  Dating a co-worker can create distractions as well.  You might find yourself spending a great deal of time trying to steal moments to be together and alone or to discuss plans that could wait for after hours.  If you are fighting or unhappy with each other, you can find yourselves being inappropriate to each other.  Dating co workers can also put you in a competition with others who may have shared a relationship with this person before, or someone who is jealous of your relationship.  If you’re going to date a physician or other coworker, keep these points in mind.  1) understand your facilities rules first, 2) Be discreet at all times and avoid public displays of affection, and 3) Never disclose private or intimate details about the relationship or about your partner to your co-workers.  I have a friend who was an LPN and got into not only a relationship with a doctor, but he happened to be married as well.  Although this may have provides some excitement and mystery into her life, that she would not have normally had, it ended up affecting her job.  They were discovered, and she ended up being the one who had to leave her position.  No affair is worth losing not only your job, but a reference, and the respect of your co-workers.  My advice?  Proceed with caution!

LPN’s: Bedside Manners

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Posted on 19th March 2010 by admin in Uncategorized

Bedside manner is one of the primary responsibilities for a LPN/LVN. LPN’s or licensed practical nurses jobs tend to be more task oriented then their counter parts the Registered Nurse.  They must do the analysis of patient health issues and consider medications and how underlying conditions might relate to health issues the patient may be experiencing presently.  Often older patients might have several conditions that need considering.  Thereafter, many of the tasks that a registered nurse might request can and will be performed by LPNs or LVN’s.  Some examples of these tasks may be pushing IV’s, hanging blood, hanging chemo or titrate drug.  Each state is specific about which tasks should be performed by LPN’s and LVN’s, so it is wise to research these expectations and requirements if you are interested in attending an LPN school.  LPN’s and LVN’s are a key element to the care of patients.  It is also a very high demand field.
Registered nurses usually perform the initial assessment of a patient. LPNs can also perform their own assessment, but the initial assessment must be performed by a RN. LPNs may also work in conjunction with RNs in patient assessment. The RN is responsible for formulating the diagnosis of the patient and makes plans for their care. In addition, a RN establishes a care plan and initiates the nursing actions to provide care. LPNs/LVNs will be primarily responsible for seeing that the patient care plans formulated by the RN are put into action. Registered nurses can delegate nursing measures to a LPN, but the LPN can only accept those tasks which are within their scope of license/practice in the state they work.

LPN’s and LVN’s

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Posted on 19th March 2010 by admin in Uncategorized

One of the highest demands right now in the Allied Health Industry is LPN’s and LVN’s.  LPN is the acronym for licensed practical nurse and LVN stands for licensed vocational nurse.  Lots of people seem to hold the opinion that if you are not a Registered Nurse, then you aren’t really a nurse.  This is an incorrect assumption.  All professionals in the Allied Health Field are needed and useful.  Just because LVN’s and LPN’s have a different name then a registered nurse, doesn’t mean that they are any less important when caring for patients.  What is the differences then?  Depending on the place of employment, LPNs are often under the direct supervision of a RN. These two types of nurses often work together to get things accomplished.  In instances of home care, a licensed practical nurse may be required to call and report or get approval from a registered nurse prior to making changes to a patient’s healthcare program. Overall, the job of a RN is more comprehensive medically than that of a LPN.  A licensed practical nurse is more task oriented and a registered nurse’s job is often more comprehensive.  This is why the expectations tend to be a bit higher for RN.  They are held accountable for the decisions made while LPN’s would only be accountable for the tasks they were asked to complete. In a medical setting, LPNs and RNs may have similar duties; but an registered nurse usually has more medical responsibilities. For the specific legal differences, refer to your states nurse practice act.  We will talk more about the job responsibilities of LPN’s in the next blog.

Phlabotemist

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Posted on 16th March 2010 by admin in Uncategorized

The other organ which is key to a phlabotemy is the heart.  For more then one reason….I mean we all have one, and the heart pumps the blood which phlabotemist must take.  So lets learn some basics today about the heart.  The heart is the major structure of the circulatory system.  It is the “pump” that circulates blood throughout the body.  It is located at the center of the thoracic cavity between the lucng with the apex (tip of heart) pointing down and slightly to the left.  The heart has four chambers that are hollow, muscular organ, slightly larger than a man’s closed fist.  It is surrounded by a thin fluid filled sac called the pericardium and its walls have three distinct layers.  The heart has two sides, a right and a left.  Each side has its walls and have three distinct layers.  The heart has two sides, a right and a left.  Each side has two chambers an upper and a lower.  One-way valves between the chambers help prevent the back-flow of blood and keep it flowing through the heart in the right direction.  The right and left chambers are separated from each other by partitions called septa.  The three layers of the heart are called the epicardium which is the thin outter layer, the myocardium which is the middle muscle layer, and the endocardium (the thin inner layer.)  The chambrs consist of the upper chambers on each side of the heart called the atria, and the lower chamber called the ventricles.  The atria are receiving chambers and and ventricles ar epumping and delivering chambers.  Finally, the valves at the entrance of the ventricles are called atrioventricular valves and the valves that exit the ventricles are called semilunar valves because they are crescent shaped like the moon.

Phlabotemist

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Posted on 16th March 2010 by admin in Uncategorized

A phlabotemist is a professional that draws blood.  Some of the most likely places you will find a phlabotemist is in a hospital or a blood bank.  With the allied health field growing so rapidly, doctors, nurse assistants and nurses prefer to have a phlabotemist handy to do all the blood draws.  I think this is a good idea.  I have small veins and I can’t tell you how many times it has taken a nurse multiple times to get the vein in my arm.  Because of these past folleys, I DREAD getting my blood drawn……when studying to become a phlabotemist it is important to be familliar with the circulatory system and the heart.  We will first (today) touch on the circulatory system.  This important bodily system consist of the cardiovascular system (heart, blood, and blood vessels) and the lymphatic system (lymph, lymph vessels, and nodes).  They circulatory system is the means by which oxygen and food are carried to the cells of the body.  It is also the means b which carbon dioxide and other wastes are carried away from the cells to the excretory organs, the kidneys, lungs and skin.  The circulatory system also aids in the coagulation process, assists in defending the body against disease, and plays an important role in the regulation of body temperature.

Phlebotomist

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Posted on 10th March 2010 by admin in Uncategorized

National Standard and Regualtory Agencies – The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organization is one of the key players in bringing quality assessment review techniques to healthcare.  The JCAHO also referred to as the Joint Commission, is a voluntary, nongovernmental agency charged with, among other things, establishing standards for the operation of hospitals and other health-related facilities and services.  Presently, it is the largest healthcare standards setting body in the world, accrediting more than 15,000 healthcare organizations.  Current Joint Commissions standards stress performance improvement by requiring the facility to be directly accountable to their customer.  This means that all departments of a healthcare facility are required to have ongoing evaluations of their activities and customer expectations.  To evaluate and track complaints about healthcare organizations relating to quality of care, the Office of Quality Monitoring was created.  Information and concerns often come from patients, their families, and healthcare employees.  A complant may be submitted by the online complaint submission form that will go directly to the Joint Commission over the internet or by summarizing the issue in a letter of no more than two pages and providing the name, street, address, city, and state of accrdited healthcare organization.  When a report is submitted the Joint commission reviews any past reports and the organization’s most recent accreditation decision.  The Joint Commission then will: Request fromt he organization a written response addressing the concern, Incorporate the concern into the performance improvement database that is used to identify trends or patterns in performance, conduct an on-site, unannounced assessment of the organization if the report raises serious concerns, about a continuing threat to patient safety or a continuing failure to comply with standards, and review the reported concern and compliance at the organization’s next accrditation survey.  Please click on the link above if you are interested in learning more about the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations.

Phlebotomist

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Posted on 10th March 2010 by admin in Uncategorized

As members of the healthcare team, phlebotomists need to understand the significance of their role in providing quality patient care.  Labratory testing is an important part of patient diagnosis and consequently a major part of patient care.  Doctors rely heavily on the validity of test results when treating a patient.  Preanalytical (before analysis) factors such as patient preparation, speciment collection procedures, and specimen handling can affect specimen quality and in turn affect the validity of test results.  Many of these factors fall under the responsibility of the phlebotomist.  To ensure consistent quality, speciment collection and handling policies and procedures fall under an overall process called quality assurance (QA).  Consumer awareness has increased lawsuits in all areas of society.  This is especially true in the healthcare industry.  Healthcare institutions search for way sto guarantee quality patient care by indentifying and minimizing situations that pose risks to patients and employees.  Guidelines are developed for all processes used and all personnel involved, and when formally adopted, they become the institutions’ quality improvement program (QI).  Measurement of performance and quality improvement projects are now part of the accrditation requirements for all types of healthcare facilities and are found in every aspect of healthcare, including phlebotomy.  One of the ways to improve is through compliance with and use of national standards and regulations.

Personal Training Certification

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Posted on 5th March 2010 by admin in Uncategorized

The field of personal training is not currently regulated by federal or state governments.  While physical therapists, athletic trainers, massage therapists, and even hairstylists are required to be licensed by the board of Health, personal trainers are not.  This is unfortunate because it would uphold a standard for personal trainers to adhere to and would add credibility to the profession.  Pretty soon, this will probably change.  If for some reason the organization you wish to use is not accredited, they should at least be recongnized by IHRSA and require their members to complete continuing education to maintain their skills.  A simple online certification isn’t adequate, and could set you up for failure, or possible legal issues in the future.

The following is the list of my top eight certifying agencies that you may explore in your journey to becoming a personal trainer.  It is up to you to decide which agency you will gain your certification with, but here are my top ten:

1.  American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)

2. Allied Health World Personal Training Certification

3. National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA)

4. National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM)

5. American Council on Exercise (ACE)

6. Aerobics and Fitness Association of America (AFAA)

7. National Federation of Personal Trainers (NFPT)

8. National Council on Strength and Fitness (NCSF)

Personal Training Certification

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Posted on 4th March 2010 by admin in Uncategorized

Personal training certification is one path you might take to become qualified to help others achieve their fitness goals.  Even if you have or are working towards a related college or university degree, becoming certified would be a good idea.  Certification is simply one more credential that will help ensure you are minimally competent in key areas before you begin your career.  Currently, there are over seventy five different certifications that trainers can obtain and this number will probably change…(or already has)!  However, only a small number of these certification programs are considered legitimate.  Also, many different organizations offer a variety of certifications.  The best method when choosing a certification program is to establish where you would like to work, and what types of clients you are attracted to, then match the certification program with your needs.  You will also want to think about how much money, time, and commitment you have.  In the end you will need to decide which organization will best help you to reach your goals, and then what types of certifications you would like to pursue.  There are numerous factors to consider when choosing an organization.  The best ones usually have a high standard for certification, then they also provide some sort of continuing/ongoing education.  Another way to ensure you are making a good choice is to choose an accredited organization.  The main agency responsible for accreditation is the National Organization for Competency Assurance (NOCA).  The NOCA puts organizations through a rigorous process to ensure they meet high standards.